NVCL Reads: Number in the Title

To help with another one of our trickier categories in the #NVCLreads Canada 150 bingo contest, here are some selections you could use for the #NVCLreadsNumber slot!

15dogsFifteen Dogs, by Andre Alexis

In this 2015 Giller Prize winner, the gods Apollo and Hermes make a bet  in a bar:  Apollo claims that if they grant human consciousness to 15 dogs each and every one of them will be even more unhappy than humans are. If even one of the dogs dies happy then Hermes wins.  So of course you have to steel yourself for the fact that all these dogs are going to die, but it’s a brilliant, moving read and completely worth it. Just make sure you have some tissues handy!

This could alternately be used in the #NVCLreadsWinner category!

playeronePlayer One, by Douglas Coupland

In his 2010 CBC Massey Lectures acclaimed novelist and visual artist Douglas Coupland explores the modern crises of time, human identity, society, religion and macroeconomics and the afterlife in the form of a novel – a 5-hour story set in an airport cocktail lounge during a global disaster.*

 

numberofthings

A Number of Things, by Jane Urquhart

Ok, I know I’m obeying the letter of the law more than the spirit here, but technically I think this counts as it literally has “A Number” in its title, and for good measure it does have an actual number in the sub-title. (Ok, Patricia is rolling her eyes at me now, so moving on…). Anyway, I think this title was made for this contest – it was written by Urquhart in celebration of Canada’s 150, and in it she chooses 50 uniquely Canadian objects and tells their stories.

For Teens…

ruleof3The Rule of Thre3, by Eric Walters

The first of a trilogy about one suburban neighbourhood’s existence after a global blackout, which has shut down everything from cell phones to basic utilities to computer-chip dependent vehicles. As resources dwindle, crises mount, and chaos descends, sixteen-year-old Adam’s neighbourhood must band together for protection, and having a police captain for a mother and a retired government spy living next door suddenly become keys to survival.*

moonatnineMoon at Nine, by Deborah Ellis

From the award-winning author of Parvana’s Journey, this 2016 title is based on interviews with a young woman forced to flee Iran because of her sexual orientation. It follows fifteen-year-old Farrin who has grown up with secrets: ten years after the overthrow of the Shah, her aristocratic mother is still working against Iran’s conservative revolutionary government. But when Farrin befriends Sadira, the intriguing and outgoing new student at her school for gifted girls, her own new secret is even more dangerous. Because the girls discover their relationship is more than just a friendship—and in Iran, being gay is punishable by death.*

juvie3

The Juvie Three, by Gordon Korman

Gecko, Terence, and Ajay are serving time in juvenile detention centers until they get a second chance. Douglas Healy, a former juvenile delinquent himself, takes them into his halfway house, hoping to make a difference in their lives. One night there is a scuffle, and Healy is accidentally knocked unconscious. When he awakes in the hospital, he has no memory of them or of the halfway house. Afraid of being sent back to Juvie, the guys hatch a crazy scheme to continue on as if the group leader never left.*  Korman does an excellent job in this novel of balancing what could otherwise be weighty topics with his trademark humour and amusing antics.

 

 

And for the Tweens and Kids, 

sevenmagpiesThe Seven Magpies, by Monica Hughes (novel)

In somewhat of a departure for Hughes, who usually writes science fiction, this novel blends mystery, fantasy, Celtic mythology, and boarding school stories.  Set during World War II, Maureen Frazer’s father has been sent to the front, her mother is helping with the war effort, and Maureen is shipped off to the Logan Academy for Young Ladies, a remote but safe boarding school in Scotland. There she finds that the girls have a secret society, called the Seven Magpies. When Maureen herself falls under the spell of a strange standing stone, she begins to understand what’s making her schoolmates seem so strange and then she discovers what the real danger is. A magical story of what may happen when teenagers tamper with the ancient power of the Celts.*

 

myarctic123My Arctic 1, 2, 3, by Michael Kusugak (picture book)

Explore Michael Kusugak’s world of animals and adventure in the Arctic Circle! Discover counting and creatures, and learn who’s predator and who’s prey. Witness five Arctic foxes hunting six furry siksiks. Then watch seven fishermen catch eight Arctic char. Numbers explored include 1 to 10, 20, 100 and even 1,000,000 (millions of berries ripen in the fall). Each scene, rendered in Vladyana Krykorka’s breathtaking paintings, is awash in Arctic colors and includes the depicted number in English and Inuktitut.*

This could alternately be used in the #NVCLreadsFirstNations or #NVCLreadsArctic categories!

 

* Description from publisher

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