Christmas Classics, Old and New

Looking for a Christmas read? Look no further!

Five Old Classics

dickensA Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens’ famous novella about an old miser, Ebenezer Scrooge, who receives a lesson in the true meaning of Christmas and is transformed into a kinder, gentler version of his former self after visitations from the ghost of his former business partner and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come. First published in London in December, 1843, and immediately popular, this work has never been out of print.

tolkienLetters From Father Christmas, by J.R.R.Tolkien
Tolkien wrote these lovely illustrated letters to his children between 1920 and 1942. From the pens of Father Christmas and his secretary, they document the goings-on of the preceding year at the North Pole, focusing on the exploits of Father Christmas, his elvish assistants, and the North Polar Bear and his cubs, Paksu and Valkotukka. The stories include a description of the huge firework display that creates the northern lights; the 1939 letter makes a reference to the Second World War.

lwLittle Women, by Louisa May Alcott
Originally published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869, Little Women tells the lives of the four March sisters – Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy – as they grow into young women in nineteenth-century New England. The novel is loosely based on the lives of the author and her three sisters. Alcott followed her Little Women with a sequel, Little Men.

cciwA Child’s Christmas in Wales, by Dylan Thomas
The Welsh poet Dylan Thomas’s delightful and nostalgic description of a Christmas from his boyhood: “One Christmas was so much like the other in those years around the sea-town corner now … that I can never remember whether it snowed for six days and six nights when I was twelve, or whether it snowed for twelve days and twelve nights when I was six”. You can read the book, or listen to Dylan Thomas reading the story himself (1952 recording) on YouTube.

togThe Tailor of Gloucester, by Beatrix Potter
A tailor sends his cat, Simpkin, on an errand to fetch food and some thread that he needs to complete a waistcoat for the mayor, who is to be married on Christmas Day. Once the cat is out, he discovers the mice that the cat had concealed under some teacups. Written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter, this children’s story was published in 1903. Potter declared that, of her own works, this was her favourite.

Five Modern Classics

chlistThe Christmas List, by Richard Evans
A Utah real estate developer by the name of James Kier opens the newspaper on the Saturday three weeks before Christmas, and is surprised to see his obituary and read that he has died in a car crash. The New York Times bestselling author of The Christmas Box and The Walk series returns with a holiday novel of hope, love, and redemption.*

acpA Christmas Promise, by Thomas Kinkade
James Cameron, a minister who runs a mission in Central America, has decided to spend the holidays in Cape Light. But when his car collides with another car, a hint of trouble befalls this close-knit community. No one is hurt, but out-of-towner Leigh Baxter is forced to stay in town until her car is fixed. What she doesn’t expect, however, is that the charm of this beautiful seaside hamlet and its citizens will soon win her over.*

hoiHolidays on Ice, by David Sedaris
A re-release of a holiday classic, expanded with new stories. This collection includes Sedaris’s famously hilarious Santaland Diaries, in which he describes his stint as a Christmas elf at Macy’s department store in New York.

polarThe Polar Express, by Chris Van Allsburg
A young boy takes a magical train ride to the North Pole on Christmas Eve, and receives the first gift of Christmas from Santa. This work won the annual Caldecott Medal for illustration of an American children’s picture book in 1986.

scjgSkipping Christmas, by John Grisham
Imagine a year without Christmas. No crowded malls, no corny office parties, no fruitcakes, no unwanted presents. That’s just what Luther and Nora Krank have in mind when they decide that, just this once, they’ll skip the holiday altogether. Theirs will be the only house on Hemlock Street without a rooftop Frosty; they won’t be hosting their annual Christmas Eve bash; they aren’t even going to have a tree. But, as this weary couple is about to discover, skipping Christmas brings enormous consequences.*

*Description from Bibliocommons

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